Tribute to Ian McKay

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On a comment on my last post I was informed of the passing of author Ian McKay on Sunday 7th July following a battle with lymphatic cancer.  Back in 2015 I reviewed Ian’s debut comic novel “Something Fishy” and he agreed to be interviewed as part of my Author Strikes Back Thread.  This established a connection with Ian’s wife Monika who has since then been one of the main contributors of comments to this site and has initiated many discussions here over the past four years.  My thoughts are with her and with Ian’s family and friends at this sad time.  As way of a tribute I thought I would repost the interview which first appeared here in August 2015.

The Author Strikes Back – Ian McKay Interview

I am absolutely delighted to welcome Ian Mckay to take part in the third interview in my Author Strikes Back category.   Ian has recently published “Something Fishy” – a comic novel centred around a fishing trip and I am very grateful that he has found time to respond to my questions.

fishy

It has taken you quite a time to put out your debut novel.  How did this come about? 

I suppose that the best way to answer your first question would be to say that I’ve been so busy ‘living an  eventful life’ that I haven’t really had much time to sit down and devote the time I needed to actually write my first book.  So, as you can imagine, apart from a few sporadic forays into the worlds of short stories and poetry writing, the economics of paying the bills and putting food on the table for a wife and four children: plus the emotional trauma of an acrimonious divorce 22 years later, left me with very little time to pursue my passion for writing. For anyone who cares to know a little more on the reason why I didn’t publish  my first novel until the age of 76, the ‘About Me’ page on my web site, http://Ian-McKay.com will tell you more.

Ian is certainly an inspiration for all of us who have put the writing on the back burner and is proof that it’s never too late to realise your dreams .

Your Disclaimer at the front of the book states it is based on “some true events”.  Without giving too much away could you reveal one of those true events for us?

In my disclaimer I did, indeed, say parts of my book were based on ‘Some true events’, one of which was the incident that happened on the charter fishing boat. When, much to the amusement of the other fishermen, the character ‘Mara’, sneezed and his false teeth shot out over the side of the boat and into the sea. 

One of the other anglers, who also wore false teeth, covertly took out his     dentures and tied them to the end of his fishing line, to fool Mara into thinking that he had ‘caught’ the set of dentures that Mara had sneezed out over the side. What he hadn’t counted on was that, when Mara popped the dentures into his mouth; and, realised that they didn’t fit, that he would take them out and throw them over the side, back into the sea.  

  The subsequent discovery of the teeth inside a large cod was pure invention on my part; and, believe it or not, the episode, back in Liverpool, when they ‘took Charlie Abbott home’ did also actually happen, however, to protect the guilty, I can’t say any more about that!

What books have made you laugh?

The books that have made me laugh are those written by Tom Sharpe, such as ‘Porterhouse Blue’; and, in particular, the ‘Wilt’ series, absolutely hilarious!

porterhousewilt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who are your comedy heroes?

My comedy heroes are many; however, if I had to make a choice, it would have to be the inspired ensemble of the whole cast of ‘Only Fools and Horses’.

foolsandhorses

I think that the writer of the series; who, sadly, died of viral pneumonia in 2011, was a comic genius.   Most people will remember the names of the main characters Del-Boy & Rodney, but how many remember the name of the man, without whom the series would never have been born, John Sullivan, the man who wrote ’Only Fools and Horses’?

sullivan

 

I also have been found, on occasions, collapsed in a heap, laughing at the ‘Allo Allo’ series, a brilliant comedy set during the second world war, in Nazi occupied France; incongruously brilliant.

What’s next for Ian McKay?

Well, as my M A degree is in writing for film and television, I have one or two comedy film scripts to my name that I intend to re-format into books: and, as a point of interest, ‘Something Fishy’ started its life as a feature length comedy film script too.

Paradoxically, I am also writing a factual series called ‘The Nazis’, which covers the period from the end of the 1st World War up until the Nuremburg war crimes trials. The first two books are titled as, ‘From The Kaiser to Weimar’ and ‘From Weimar to Hitler’. The third book in the series, ‘Hitler’s First Year’ is still a work in progress.

I would like to thank Ian for providing me with a copy of “Something Fishy” and for answering my questions and I’d like to remind you that this comic novel is available from Amazon both as a paperback and as a Kindle edition by following this direct link. Ian’s non-fiction titles mentioned above are also available from Amazon or by following the link from his website http://Ian-McKay.com

Buy “Something Fishy” from Amazon.co.uk

My original review of “Something Fishy” can be found here

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The Author Strikes Back – Benita Jayne – A Kid-Lit Special

I have recently joined Facebook after resisting for many years.  The reason behind this was a school reunion that I was not able to go to which had its own Facebook group and photographs.  I found myself itching to see how well or otherwise people had aged.  Within a very short time I was back in touch with people who I had not had any contact with for, in some case, 30+ years.  I discovered that one of these, the writer of “Sacred Crystal Pyramid”, the first book in the Angel Messengers Series,  Benita Jayne, I knew under another name and that she was my old school pal who I used to travel on the 207 bus to school in the mornings.  Benita and I have had our own little reunion thanks to the “Sacred Crystal Pyramid” and I am delighted to welcome her to my Author Strikes Back thread where she has gamely answered questions which sprung to my mind whilst reading her book.  So without further ado……………………

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Benita Jayne

How did the idea of a series based around the Angelic Kingdom develop and why was Amethyst a good candidate to enter the kingdom?

I regularly use meditation to relax. During my relaxed state I had the vision to create guided  meditations (describing the place in detail like reading a book) that can take a person on a journey to a healing Angelic world to help reduce stress, aid relaxation and inner healing. The  places that were created for meditation were magical and this inspired me to create an adventure book, based around the places descibed.

I wanted Amethyst not to be the usual type of character that would journey to these places.  The experience for her would be unbelievable, hence her reaction from being a feisty character to one of awe and disbelief. To me she was the girl I wish I could have been.

benita

What comes across well is your warmness towards the healing power of angels.  Can you tell us more about that?

I have used Reiki angelic healing for quite some time for myself, friends and family. Some experiences have been overwhelming and have created my passion to explore this area further. I have read and heard of many accounts of amazing and lovely experiences with Angels. There are many different beliefs and I respect everyone’s personal belief, however Angels cross many different religons and cultures. I wanted to share my experiences in the form of a fantasy adventure book.

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With children’s books we are often aiming to create lasting memories.  What children’s books have been close to you since childhood?

The books that I remember most were the Enid Blyton Adventure series of books. It is funny how you never forget the characters and amazing adventures they have. To me they remain an important part of your childhood experience. Like your favourite sweets and TV characters, when you remember them it brings a good feeling inside.

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Do you know, the Enid Blyton Adventure books really never made an impression on me when I was a child, whereas I do read adventure books now.  The Enid Blyton books I loved were her magical stories aimed at younger readers.  I was particularly obsessed with a tale about a pixie market for a number of years.  It’s amazing to think now how much influence she wielded on quite a few generations of young readers.  Anyway, I digress…next question

It’s very clear that the Angel Messenger series is a labour of love.  You have developed a website  which has  special message cards and have been in charge of design and cover illustration for both books and website.  How important is this multi-media approach for children’s books today?

The strange thing is I started creating the Angel message cards before the book. I wanted to be able to inspire young people, to feel they are amazing, caring, capable of following their personal dreams. The book concept was born from the characters on the cards and the places I had created in my meditations. 

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My background is in design and illustration so it was a passion to create something that would work and support the series of books. The messages have been developed further and are now an extension of the books inspiration.  I wanted to share the experience of the angelic adventure being able to build confidence, vision, hopes and dreams.

Many books and characters now exist in a multi media form, Harry Potter is a prime example. I think multi media is now expected by the majority of industries, including books. 

The essence of a book can sometimes be lost in translation in a film as some of the detail and thoughts of the characters are lost.  Some of the popular books are then seen as a highly commercial and profitable business in the world of licensing and manufacturing and may dilute the original thoughts and message of the author. 

However if multi media is thoughtfully created,  it can be used in a positive way to communicate very important messages from the author to the reader. 

What’s next for Benita Jayne?

It is very important for me to help children know they are special no matter what their beliefs, culture or country they belong to. I have left the story open to enable me to take the characters to many places in the world to explore different countries and cultures. 

I am thinking about creating meditations for young people to help with daily stress, relaxation to help with studying and being creative. Look out for the next exciting announcements on angelmessengers.co.uk or follow me on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter for inspirational messages.

Many thanks for Benita for answering the questions and I would like to wish her luck with the rest of her Angel Messengers series of books. The first in the series, “The Sacred Crystal Pyramid” can be purchased on Amazon by clicking on the book title.  The book has attracted some great reviews.

Let’s not leave it another 30 years, Benita!

 

 

The Author Strikes Back – Vaughn Entwistle

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I was very pleased to be contacted recently by Vaughn Entwistle whose novel “The Angel Of Highgate” I found so entertaining.  Vaughn left a comment on my review (always a little nerve-wracking when an author does this).  I contacted him to thank him for his kind words and was thrilled that he has agreed to answer questions about his book.  I am also delighted that he dressed up for the occasion.    So without further ado…………….

angelofhighgate

What is it about Highgate Cemetery that made you choose it as a central location for your novel?

The inspiration for the novel came many, many years ago when I was a  graduate student. I was wandering the stacks of the university library when I happened to pick up a book entitled: Highgate Cemetery: Victorian Valhalla, by Felix Barker.

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There wasn’t much text: just a brief introduction to the history of Highgate Cemetery and a few simple maps of the grounds. But what made the book so compelling were the atmospheric black and white photographs taken by John Gay, a professional photographer. The book was published in 1988 and many of the photographs were taken around that time. They show a Highgate in full surrender to nature with its tombs and statuary (many since lost to erosion or attacks by vandals) wreathed in vines and slowly submerging beneath foliage. At this time, West Highgate had long gone out of business as a cemetery and was derelict and overgrown.  A volunteer society: The Friends of Highgate Cemetery, have since taken it over and are working to restore the cemetery, which now also serves as a wildlife sanctuary and is home to many species of birds, as well as foxes, badgers, and the occasional wallaby. (Yes, really!)

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Highgate Cemetery

As I pored over the book, I was immediately struck by the sheer gravitas of the place:  gothic, mysterious, and suffused in entropic decay. Here’s a few words you may or may not be familiar with: tapophile (one who loves graves, cemeteries and funerals) and coimetromania (an abnormal compulsion to visit cemeteries). Both words aptly describe me. I grew up in northern England watching Hammer films and loved all things spooky and eldritch. At any rate, the book affected me deeply and I immediately recognized that Highgate would make a magnificent setting for a novel. After university I went on to have a career as a writer/editor working in various industries, but part of my mind was still back in Highgate cemetery, spawning a cast of characters to inhabit this moody necropolis. Decades later, I finally sat down to write The Angel of Highgate, a novel in which the cemetery functions as a major character in the dramatic action.

Described as “the wickedest man in London”, a description which certainly seems fitting at the start of the novel where there’s a little bit of playful misleading from yourself, main character Lord Geoffrey Thraxton has to win us readers over, which he does.  How did you develop the character of this unlikely hero?

My protagonist, Lord Geoffrey Thraxton is a louche lord with Byronesque pretensions and a morbid fascination with death. Like Highgate, Thraxton is a dark mirror of the Victorian era, whose outward veneer of Empire, modernity and wealth concealed a seething underworld of vice and crime, crushing poverty, and rampant disease such as consumption (tuberculosis), which prematurely snuffed out rich and poor alike. It could be argued that the Victorians fetishised death with their elaborate mourning rituals and their creation of London’s Magnificent Seven cemeteries—Highgate, Kensal Green, etc.  A more shocking example currently circulating the web is photos of Victorian families posing with dead relatives/children.  Although ghastly and ghoulish to modern eyes, the photographs were taken as treasured mementos of a lost beloved.

Like many of the time, Thraxton suffered a deep trauma in early childhood when his mother died.  Thraxton’s brutish father soon remarried and withdrew all love from the young boy, who was left to wander the cold halls of Thraxton hall, forgotten and alone. By chance the young lord strayed into the family mausoleum and found that the screws of his mother’s coffin had been removed. Thraxton opened the lid . . . and crawled inside, seeking the comforting embrace of his mother’s arms.

 “The Angel of Highgate” is a highly enjoyable Victorian novel.  Which novels from the Victorian period have given you the most enjoyment?

Anything by Dickens, of course. Bleak House is arguably my favourite. I read Oliver Twist at very young age and still remember it vividly (especially the scene where he is apprenticed to a coffin maker and spends a terrifying night alone with the coffins). This scene is probably what gave me the twisted sensibilities that later drove me to write The Angel of Highgate. The Woman in White and Moonstone by Wilkie Collins, are other faves. The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot is poetic and beautiful. And of course, Austen is represented by Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility. The Victorians produced a singularly amazing coterie of poets/playwrights and novelists. 

 

Some of Vaughn’s Victorian picks

One section which is written with real relish is how Lord Thraxton deals with a critic who savaged his poetry.  Thraxton describes critics as “leeches sucking on the body of art” and his subsequent treatment should make us reviewers wince.  What’s the worst criticism you have had to endure?

I don’t know if it was apparent to readers (some material was edited out) but Thraxton was a pretty lousy poet and the unfortunate critic’s scathing review of Thraxton’s collection of poetry was entirely warranted.

I have to admit that bad reviews wound at the deepest level and are hard to recover from. At first I read every review, good or bad. But I have found that the bad reviews tend to stick in one’s mind much longer than the good reviews, so now I stop reading a review as soon as I gather that it is turning negative. (There is enough rejection in a novelist’s life; I don’t need to go looking for more.)

I will say that reviewers on web sites are generally fairer than the snarky comments one reads on sites like GoodReads or Amazon. There is a lot of obvious trolling and “sock-puppeting” taking place on these sites and reading some critiques it soon becomes apparent that the reviewer has not even read the book, as evidenced by confused character identifications and other giveaways.

One thing that helps me put criticism in perspective is to read reviews of books by authors that I greatly admire. Even terrific writers who have written terrific books receive the odd nasty review. On GoodReads you can check out reader reviews of books such as J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series. In amongst the five star reviews you will find a scattering of one and two star reviews by people trying to convince the rest of the world that, despite the massive success of these novels, the books are trash and that the rest of us are deluded fools. I don’t understand why these people can’t admit that the novel was just “not their kind of book.”

Speaking of which, I recently received the worst review I’ve ever had on the website Fandom Post. The reviewer opined that every character was a cliché, every situation in the book was a cliché, and basically hated every sentence.

The sheer vitriol of the review took my aback, since most of the reviews have been overwhelmingly positive. Makes you wonder, doesn’t it? I think the reviewer even hated the cover art and the type font. If only I could arrange a meeting between this critic and my antagonist, Dr. Silas Garrette (insert fiendish laughter here: Moohahaha!)

What’s next for Vaughn Entwistle?

I am currently writing the third novel in my Paranormal Casebooks series, entitled The Faery Vortex and I am also working on a collection of Ghost/Horror/Weird fiction stories. 

Lastly, I would like to end by thanking Phil Ramage and all the other independent book bloggers out there. Now that most major newspapers have decreased or reduced the size of their book review pages, independent Book Bloggers are vital resource for both readers and writers alike.

 Thanks, to you all for what you do.

 

Thanks for the thumbs up, Vaughn and for the considered responses to the questions which have certainly enriched the experience of “The Angel Of Highgate” for me.  Both this and his two novels  in his “Paranormal Casebooks of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle”  “The Revenant of Thraxton Hall” and “The Dead Assassin” are available from Amazon (Clicking on the titles should take you straight there).

For more information about Vaughn Entwistle you can visit his website or the website of his publishers Titan Books.

 

 

The Author Strikes Back – Chris Whitaker Interview

Whitaker, Chris

Today I am absolutely delighted to welcome to reviewsrevues.com Chris Whitaker who is experiencing the thrill of of having his debut novel published tomorrow on 7th April.  I have already read, reviewed and thoroughly enjoyed his book.  My thoughts on  “Tall Oaks” can be found here.   I’ve put together some questions for Chris that were niggling around after I finished his book and it is great that he has found the time to answer them.

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Why does a British novelist choose to set his debut in the fictional American town of Tall Oaks?

I’ve always been a fan of books (Boy’s Life) and television shows (Fargo) set in small town America. When I first conceived of the idea for Tall Oaks I knew that I wanted to write a story that featured a really diverse group of characters, each with quite different concerns and problems. But I also wanted them to feel connected, so the small town setting seemed to fit well. I also liked the idea of this glossy, respectable facade masking all of these huge secrets. In that respect Tall Oaks is part Stepford, part Twin Peaks. 

As for America, setting Tall Oaks there made some of the plot points work in a way that they might not have had I set the book in the UK. I wanted Jim (policeman) to be working the case mostly alone, which given the more autonomous nature of their towns seemed much more realistic. There’s a feeling that the case is already old news, that the media have lost interest and moved onto the next sensational crime, which felt much more plausible in such a large country with a high crime rate. And I wanted one of my characters to have easy access to a gun!

I also hoped that my publisher might fly me to California for research purposes but they told me I had ‘unrealistic expectations.’

 How did the character of Manny, a great comic creation by the way, come about?

Thank you! I’m so glad that there’s been such a positive response to Manny. Whenever I meet anyone that’s read Tall Oaks the first thing they want to talk about is Manny! 

The first time I sat down to begin writing Tall Oaks I started with Manny. His opening scene, walking toward school dressed head-to-toe in pinstripes, despite the sweltering heat, it still makes me smile now. I didn’t know how he’d fit into the rest of the story, but I wanted to include some teenage characters, I really enjoyed writing the dialogue between them. 

I’ve read quite a few gangster novels over the years, and loved watching The Sopranos, so Manny is kind of a (warped) tribute to them. I wanted him to be funny, and fearless, but also quite vulnerable once you scratch the surface. I think lots of teenagers face a bit of an identity crisis when it comes to leaving school and trying to work out what they want to do in the real world. Though Manny’s father walking out has left him struggling more than most.

Dark Crime and Comedy – Do the two mix?

God I hope so, though I think it’s quite tricky to get the balance right. I thought about writing a straight crime novel, and did try a couple of times, but it never felt quite right.

I wanted Tall Oaks to be first and foremost a story about a town, a snapshot of life over one, hot summer. Of course everyone would be at different stages in their lives, experiencing highs and lows unique to them. Whether the lows are as horrific as having your child taken from you, or the highs as trivial as finding a date for prom, they are relative to each individual character.

I think it helped setting the novel three months after the crime, as for those not closely affected things would begin to return to normal. And normal is laughing, crying, dating, having fun, worrying about exams etc.

 It was also nice to write. For every Jess scene there’s a Manny to maintain the balance.

There’s a line in the book where Jim says ‘You can’t stand in the dark all the time, because then you forget there’s daylight out there.’

From the point of view of a British author just completing an American novel what are the “great American novels?”

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald: The roaring twenties come to life in this classic. The American dream is embodied by the enigmatic and mysterious Jay Gatsby.

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger: I first read this at school and have since found that Holden Caulfield is a character that lives long in the memory.

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee: Sad, funny, and beautifully crafted. Atticus Finch is my hero! A masterpiece.   (I agree – My review is here)

The Road by Cormac McCarthy: One of my all time favourites. A father and son travel across post-apocalyptic America. It’s dark and haunting and will stay with me forever.  

Can I stick Tall Oaks on the end of this list?

Chris’ line-up for The Great American novel

I’ll think about that one Chris……..I thought you might sneak it in there somewhere! I’ve not yet got round to “The Road” but have recently  read a new book that people are comparing it to – “Gold Fame Citrus” by Claire Vaye Watkins so may be one for you to watch out for.  Totally agree about “Mockingbird”.  I think you need to be the right age to read “Catcher” and then it transforms your existence – I think I might have been a bit too old when I got round to it.  F.Scott Fitzgerald has never done it for me – but I haven’t totally given up on him.  I’d probably swap him for Steinbeck’s “Grapes Of Wrath” but I approve of your choices…

What’s next for Chris Whitaker?

I’m currently working on The Summer Cloud. It’s a story about a cloud that appears over a small town and stays there. The chapters alternate between first person, a missing schoolgirl (Summer) telling her story, and narrative which follows the residents of the town as they try and go about life in darkness. It’s a bit of a strange one (for a change).

My kids are so noisy that I worry I’ll never get the peace and quiet needed to finish it. Maybe I should come and stay with you. I could ask my publisher to foot the bill. I wonder how much a helicopter to the Isle of Wight costs.

You would be very welcome and if the publisher is footing the bill I might even run to placing a chocolate on your pillow.  I will be certainly looking forward to reading “The Summer Cloud” –it sounds fascinating.  Of course, we never have any clouds on the Isle of Wight- so I’m going to have to use my imagination!

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Chris coming in to land or coastguard rescue over Freshwater, Isle Of Wight?

Many thanks to Chris for his spirited responses. Also a big thanks to Emily at Bonnier Zaffre publishers for organising this.   “Tall Oaks” is available to buy from Amazon by following this link.

 

The Author Strikes Back – Ian McKay Interview

I am absolutely delighted to welcome Ian Mckay to take part in the third interview in my Author Strikes Back category.   Ian has recently published “Something Fishy” – a comic novel centred around a fishing trip and I am very grateful that he has found time to respond to my questions.

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It has taken you quite a time to put out your debut novel.  How did this come about? 

I suppose that the best way to answer your first question would be to say that I’ve been so busy ‘living an  eventful life’ that I haven’t really had much time to sit down and devote the time I needed to actually write my first book.  So, as you can imagine, apart from a few sporadic forays into the worlds of short stories and poetry writing, the economics of paying the bills and putting food on the table for a wife and four children: plus the emotional trauma of an acrimonious divorce 22 years later, left me with very little time to pursue my passion for writing. For anyone who cares to know a little more on the reason why I didn’t publish  my first novel until the age of 76, the ‘About Me’ page on my web site, http://Ian-McKay.com will tell you more.

Ian is certainly an inspiration for all of us who have put the writing on the back burner and is proof that it’s never too late to realise your dreams .

Your Disclaimer at the front of the book states it is based on “some true events”.  Without giving too much away could you reveal one of those true events for us?

In my disclaimer I did, indeed, say parts of my book were based on ‘Some true events’, one of which was the incident that happened on the charter fishing boat. When, much to the amusement of the other fishermen, the character ‘Mara’, sneezed and his false teeth shot out over the side of the boat and into the sea. 

One of the other anglers, who also wore false teeth, covertly took out his     dentures and tied them to the end of his fishing line, to fool Mara into thinking that he had ‘caught’ the set of dentures that Mara had sneezed out over the side. What he hadn’t counted on was that, when Mara popped the dentures into his mouth; and, realised that they didn’t fit, that he would take them out and throw them over the side, back into the sea.  

  The subsequent discovery of the teeth inside a large cod was pure invention on my part; and, believe it or not, the episode, back in Liverpool, when they ‘took Charlie Abbott home’ did also actually happen, however, to protect the guilty, I can’t say any more about that!

What books have made you laugh?

The books that have made me laugh are those written by Tom Sharpe, such as ‘Porterhouse Blue’; and, in particular, the ‘Wilt’ series, absolutely hilarious!

porterhousewilt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who are your comedy heroes?

My comedy heroes are many; however, if I had to make a choice, it would have to be the inspired ensemble of the whole cast of ‘Only Fools and Horses’.

foolsandhorses

I think that the writer of the series; who, sadly, died of viral pneumonia in 2011, was a comic genius.   Most people will remember the names of the main characters Del-Boy & Rodney, but how many remember the name of the man, without whom the series would never have been born, John Sullivan, the man who wrote ’Only Fools and Horses’?

sullivan

 

I also have been found, on occasions, collapsed in a heap, laughing at the ‘Allo Allo’ series, a brilliant comedy set during the second world war, in Nazi occupied France; incongruously brilliant.

What’s next for Ian McKay?

Ian Photo For Authors Interview008

Well, as my M A degree is in writing for film and television, I have one or two comedy film scripts to my name that I intend to re-format into books: and, as a point of interest, ‘Something Fishy’ started its life as a feature length comedy film script too.

Paradoxically, I am also writing a factual series called ‘The Nazis’, which covers the period from the end of the 1st World War up until the Nuremburg war crimes trials. The first two books are titled as, ‘From The Kaiser to Weimar’ and ‘From Weimar to Hitler’. The third book in the series, ‘Hitler’s First Year’ is still a work in progress.

I would like to thank Ian for providing me with a copy of “Something Fishy” and for answering my questions and I’d like to remind you that this comic novel is available from Amazon both as a paperback and as a Kindle edition by following this direct link. Ian’s non-fiction titles mentioned above are also available from Amazon or by following the link from his website http://Ian-McKay.com

Buy “Something Fishy” from Amazon.co.uk

My original review of “Something Fishy” can be found here