Krindlekrax- Philip Ridley (Red Fox 1991)- A Kid-Lit Review

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Earlier this week I was reminiscing on this blog with Cleopatra Loves Books  (see the 22 Letters post for the discussion) about the end of the afternoon story time at Primary School and how much these books meant to us.

When this book was published I was working as a Primary School teacher and there was nothing better for forging a relationship with the class and for turning them onto books than the carefully selected novel read in instalments. Nowadays, with the over-crowded curriculum I understand that this practice is much less common, which is tragic. My all-time favourite book for reading to the children was “Krindlekrax”.

We are taken to Lizard Street, a location which seems very real and yet dream-like. Ridley uses repetition so effectively to build up an almost hypnotic effect. This creates, as in many of the best children’s books, a kind of skewed reality. The superb cast of characters all have some identifying quirk and/or a catchphrase (“Oh Polly-Wolly-Doodle-All- The-Day”!) or sound effect which are used and built upon sublimely in the telling of this story.

It is the tale of Ruskin Splinter, the boy who wants to be the hero in the school play and tame the dragon and who is denied the chance because of his unheroic appearance in favour of Elvis Cave, who menaces the whole of Lizard Street with his football (Da-Boing!), breaking windows even at night whilst sleepwalking. Ruskin’s only friend is Corky, the school caretaker, an adorable character who regularly gets my eyes misting up. Ten years before there had been an incident on Lizard Street which had turned Corky’s hair white and given him a limp, caused cracks in the pavement and the bricks to go dark.

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Like the best traditional tales the plot is simple and yet runs very deep and you find yourself responding in the same subconscious, intuitive level as to the best and earliest stories. There’s issues on self-esteem and self-image, bullying, coping with death, separating fantasy from reality, being judged by appearances and the realisation that time existed and things happened before you were born; all dilemmas likely to be faced by the child reader and reaching some resolution here.

The use of sound is exceptional. The creaking pub sign “Eek!”, the drain cover “Ka-Clunk!”, the football “Da-Boing!” gets children anticipating and joining in. I had second language children with very little English who loved this book and begged to take it home. These sounds, together with the characters identifying phrases and gestures helps the story to build up and children experience the same chills as in those classic games “What’s The Time Mister Wolf?” and “In A Dark, Dark House.” Ridley doesn’t cop out with the climax, it’s every bit as scarey as the build up suggests.

Twenty-four years after its publication this book still reads extremely well. It is a relief to find a book directed at this age group that doesn’t rely on underpants, snot or pooh for its humour. I never read aloud a book (with the exception of Michael Rosen’s poetry) that was such a huge hit. Year 3 classes adored it and when on one occasion I taught a Year 5 class who I’d also had as Year 3, they were clear they wanted to be re-read this and enjoyed it as much (if not more) the second time. I hope these children are reading this to their children now.

“Krindlekrax” won The Smarties Prize in 1991 and WH Smith Mind-Boggling Book Award. The author has written a number of other children’s books which didn’t quite have the same magic for me (although I am very fond of “Kaspar In The Glitter”). Philip Ridley is one of those multi-talented in many fields individuals. He has written adult novels and plays, plays for children, poetry, screenplays, directed films and is a photographer, artist, songwriter, musician and has written an opera. He is an exceptional, under-rated British talent, and this book, which was for a number of children I taught “the book” that springboarded them into reading and could very well be his finest work.

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Krindlekrax was published in 1991 by Red Fox

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